Another Way to Help Out JDiggins

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Forrest Fenn has donated the original artwork of The Dancing Gypsies from p. 43 of The Thrill of the Chase. A silent auction is being conducted on Cynthia’s blog.

And, there is this post today from forum:hint of riches. QUOTED–

This is HUGE
Please, everyone listen with big ears (to quote Forrest).

As of today we have raised $16,255.72 to help Jamie Jordan, who lost her home and business in the terrible Mendocino Fire. If we can get enough donations to raise that figure to $26,255.72 by August 31, Forrest will donate $10,000 to Jamie. That will give us $36,255.72. WOW!

Please help us spread this word around the search community because we need everybody’s help.
Here is the paypal: https://www.paypal.me/JJDiggins

For updates on the September 6th drawing to benefit Jamie, who lost her home in the Mendocino fire, click this.

 

Brave? (A Visual Aid)

sunset beach people sunrise

Watch this.  Click on:  Ten Meter Tower 

                                    (a short film by two Swedes.)

Who do you relate to most? I mean, if  you were to give it a go.

Blue Hole cold water

Reference pages 7 and 73 in ONCE UPON A WHILE for Forrest Fenn’s version of going for it.

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History 109 (Portal Revisited)

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East Palace

On a quiet Sunday afternoon, I finally strolled over to find Dorothy McKibbin’s obscure office space.

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(And found another interesting gallery nearby.)

 

 

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In a previous post, I mentioned Sheinkin’s excellent hx books

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And for an exciting historical fiction read regarding the Norwegian episode of the race, read The Saboteur, by Andrew Gross.

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And Fennboree 2018 Begins!

 

T-shirt

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BoomerGirl wins the Fenn Trivia Contest

BoomerGirl also brought a boat-load of bananas and is rocking her new hair.

Wisconsin Mike brought his kids (his daughter won the kid’s trivia contest) and oversaw an experiment in crowd-sourcing the clues. Results to be announced tomorrow. Participation may have been intentionally vague, although several searchers have a high level of confidence in their solves.

Joe & Joe, Jr.

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Joe and Joe, Jr. from Ohio are tight-lipped about where the treas ure is, but I like the treasure hanging around Junior’s neck: a frog forged by his dad that bears an unusually strong resemblance to Forrest’s creations.

 

Thank you, Connie, for organizing the events this weekend. And best wishes to Vicki from Kentucky who’s been armchair searching since 2013, but on this, her first BOTG search, suffered altitude sickness and has visited a local oxygen bar for relief.

Colorado Bob and the Red-Head head up a 4-generation search team. Great-grandson Hunter has been on 2 of their 18+ searches.  Ken from Georgia is on his 21st trip to the Rockies. Lots more searchers present that I didn’t get to speak with. Good-luck everyone!

A lot of journalists covered tonight’s kick-off: Toby, of course, and free-lancer Lucy, Sheila of The Daily Mail online, Miranda and her photographer Annie from Esquire Britain.

As Forrest’s father said, “The banana train only goes around once.”

Banana Train

 

Reblogged: Stop This Nonsense…… — Thrill Of The Chase

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Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

A difference of opinions on the Chase. I’m with Forrest and Dal on this.

New Mexico State Patrol Chief, Pete Kassetas The New Mexico State Patrol Chief wants Forrest to stop the chase. He called it “nonsense” and suggested that Forrest should go get the chest “if it exists”. Pretty insulting, don’t you think? Pete Kassetas is the chief’s name and he seems to be pretty full of…

via Stop This Nonsense…… — Thrill Of The Chase

Forrest Fenn on TV This Weekend

Saturday morning tune in to NBC’s Weekend Today Show for the latest from Forrest Fenn, who hid a treasure chest somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe.

Here’s a link to the interview.

Here’s a link to  the announcement on Dal’s site.

100 Years Ago

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On Summer Seas (1916)

The National Park Service was created one hundred years ago.  Yellowstone preceded that, being designated in 1872.  And once upon a time, I dreamed of being a forest ranger.  My imagination had me up in a tower in a sea of green trees–a rather narrow view of the current job description.

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Glacier National Park

 

One of the more unique rangers we’ve met was dressed to the hilt as a French voyageur  and remained in character, impressing our youngest.  I think there was even bread baking involved.

 

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1868 Quetico Superior Route, Passing a Waterfall by Frances Anne Hopkins (Scene showing a large Hudson’s Bay Company freight canoe passing a waterfall, presumably on the French River. The passengers in the canoe may be the artist and her husband, Edward Hopkins, secretary to the Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.) (public domain)

That national park was the site of the Rainy Lake gold rush in the mid-1890’s.  Northern Minnesota is not the first place I’d think of when searching for gold.  Better odds, maybe, of finding Forrest Fenn’s treasure chest.

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Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

 

Longevity

Don’t you wonder what secrets to a long and happy life Forrest Fenn might share?  (In addition to being extremely fortunate in the outcome of his flying career, I mean.)

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100 years ago

So, I asked him.  Diet?  Exercise?  Are you some sort of vegan?

His response:

This old lady was asked that question. She said she drank 4 Dr. Peppers a day since she was 8 years old. She said her doctors promised she would die at an early age if she didn’t stop. She said, “I’m 104 years-old, still drinking 4 Dr. Peppers a day and my doctors are all dead.”

Wiki-link — Dr Pepper   Interesting:  they sued Coca-Cola back in the fifties.

Once, at the county fair, I tossed rings and won a couple large, glass bottles of Dr Pepper.  I had to give them to my brother because I couldn’t stand the flavor;  tasted too much like prune juice?    Like a lot of other fine things, I acquired a taste for it later in life.

Happy hunting, all!

 

 

Portal

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I won’t be making it to this year’s Fennboree, but if I could, I would take a moment in Santa Fe to get a look at an ancient wrought iron gate on East Palace Avenue, the site where dozens if not hundreds of scientists, mathematicians, and physicists, after meeting with gatekeeper Dorothy McKibben, disappeared from sight beginning in April 1943.P1000401

(Well, first I might stop at that French pastry shop at La Fonda where Amy bought those gorgeous treats for Forrest’s book signing last September.)

Said portal transported those invited to the site of the Los Alamos Ranch School on a mesa in New Mexico.  You probably know (part of) the rest of the story, but for me, I learned a lot from a book called Bomb, by Steve Sheinkin, my newest favorite non-fiction author.  Wow.  He used to write textbooks for schools but kept notes on all the things they wouldn’t let him put in–fascinating stuff I should have learned.   Sheinkin puts it together in a compelling and quick read.  (Young Adult level but hey, who’s got time for an academic treatise these days?)

So back to the story:  the race between the Americans and the Germans to develop the bomb; some very, very brave Norwegians on a mission; the spies who wanted to steal the plans for Stalin;  the guys who just wanted to give it to the Russians so there wouldn’t be only one superpower in possession of the new and terrible weapon of mass destruction.

When I was young, my ideas of Russian spies were partly based on Boris and Natasha, and hearing intimations about the McCarthy era excesses.  Somehow my public school history classes never got much past the Civil War by the end of the school year, hence the black holes in my knowlege.  (No, that’s not a typo;  it’s spelled Fenn’s way.)

 

[Side note:  There was a Rocky and Bullwinkle episode titled Buried Treasure.  Hmm.  Frostbite Falls?]P1000443

 

I could also rave about Sheinkin’s newest book,  Most Dangerous:  Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret Viet Nam War.  I have no excuse for not knowing or remembering more about the topic, having been of school age when it was in the newspapers, except that the facts didn’t all make it into the media at the time.  I wish that weren’t still true. History gives us perspective if we’d only choose to look at the parallels in our own day.  Does your view of Ellsberg color your impression of Snowden?  What caused Benjamin Arnold to switch sides?  Had you even heard of the Port Chicago 50?

Do you agree with Abraham Lincoln?

“I am a firm believer in the people.  If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis.  The great point is to bring them the real facts.”

(Check out Steve Sheinkin’s  other books like King George:  What Was His Problem?  or The Port Chicago 50:  Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights or  Lincoln’s Grave Robbers, etc.)

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Scouting New Mexico

My first visit to New Mexico was brief, less than 24 hours.  I came down from Colorado on the dark side of the mountains one night and was glad to arrive (safely) at the hotel in Santa Fe.  Not until morning did I try to find Fenn’s place.  I had the address.  I had GPS.  I had an invitation.  But.  The car was leading me out of town, back into the mountains.  The streets were one way this way and that.  And narrow.  No view.  Claustrophobic.

I’d allowed plenty of time but it was fading fast.  Aha, I thought.  I’ll go to the bookstore.  They must know where Forrest lives.  When I asked the nice guy behind the counter in Collected Works, he said, “Why don’t you just call him?  He’s in the phonebook.”  I said just point me in the right direction.  I made it on time and there he was, just like he says in the book. to show you care.

Cactus

Cactus

I had to head home then, and didn’t explore the mountains north of Santa Fe, or even Santa Fe, for that matter.  And between you and me, I was relieved to be out in the open sky again.  I’m not a desert person.  I don’t get it.  Give me green;  changing seasons;  trees.

Book Signing at La Fonda

Still, when the approval/opportunity came up to return for one of Forrest’s book signings, I jumped at it.  Leaving in the midst of harvest?  Well, I’d pay the piper later.  Short notice, but what did I need to pack, really?  Camera, phone, the book to be signed.  Good to go.

About halfway to Santa Fe, the climate changes, the trees disappear, the dirt turns red.  Very red, and it was flying where the farmers worked it.  And of course, it was hot when I left and got hotter the further west I went.

Blue Hole details

First tourist stop?  The Blue Hole I’d read about.  It would make living in the desert bearable.  Almost.  If I scuba dived.

Cold Water in Blue Hole

Cold Water in Blue Hole

Another thing that makes it bearable, is altitude.  (It turns out my car’s GPS does have an altimeter, after all.  Wish I’d noticed it on my last trip to the Rocky Mountains, where I was gauging altitude by how short of breath I was.)  By the time I hit 6,000 feet above sea level, Santa Fe, in other words, it was a bit cooler and a lot livelier.  So.  I had two or three days, depending on an incomplete arrangement, to explore the land of enchantment.

First up, the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway loop around the mountains above Taos.  It was by (fortunate) chance that I chose to drive the loop clockwise that Sunday, since there was some sort of mountain bike event and dozens of bikers were taking it counter-clockwise.  Nine or ten thousand feet above sea level –  I don’t know how they do it.  (A couple of them looked like they were wondering if they could do it.)  My car didn’t care for the altitude, either.  The capless fuel flap didn’t want to give.  Thank you, kind station attendant!

P1000309I knew I wanted to visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Angel Fire. (See this post.)

And this.San Francisco de Assissi Mission Church in Rancho de Taos

And then I thought I’d stop at the Rio Grande Visitor Center on my way back to Santa Fe, but I made a wrong turn and ended up here.

Ojo Calientes

Facing this,

One lane bridge

One lane bridge

and, nearby, Bears Again

Seriously.  Bears, again?

Actually, it wasn’t bears that scared me away.

New Mexico Museum of Art

New Mexico Museum of Art

I stuck to Santa Fe proper on Monday and saw the most amazing “painting” made of found things (think Forrest’s Holiday Ornament Contest) in the New Mexico Museum of Art.  Pansy Stockton  (1895 – 1972) used things like bark, moss, twigs, and so forth and created beautiful images that from a distance looked finely painted.  The one on display was of a waterfall, and the milkweed silk gleamed perfectly as falling water.

Pirates

Pirates – Captain Hawkes Sets Sail

Bronze Elk

As I played tourist, I scouted for parking for the evening event at La Fonda, remembering the difficulty I’d had on my first visit to Santa Fe.

Miracle Stairway

Miracle Stairway

Monday evening was the book signing and the chance to meet some fellow treasure seekers, one of whom brought a box of fabulous French pastries to share!

La Fonda Blaze

La Fonda Blaze

Arrangements fell into place for Tuesday evening, so I had the day to explore more of the mountains north of Santa Fe.

66,000 Links North of Santa Fe

66,000 Links North of Santa Fe

Audubon Primitive Fat Tire Trail Etiquette

In particular, the Ski Basin and the Audubon park.

Bold BoulderIn the WoodsRock BandTrail Marker

National Forest

And then, when it was time to head home, I saw the blaze.

Morning Blaze Over Santa Fe

Morning Blaze Over Santa Fe