Discovering a real Jurassic Park

What a cool opportunity!

highland hind

P1080035A ranch. Somewhere high in north-western Montana. We’re fly fishing in the baking heat, casting for trout, listening to the trickle of clear spring creeks and glimpsing sleek, fast-moving shapes in the shadows.

It should be relaxing, but I’m distracted. I discovered in a chance conversation with the rancher’s wife earlier in the morning that at least two dinosaurs are entombed in rock on their land and she promised a ride to where the university volunteers are digging – and spending the long scorching summer.

“Yeah, they’re all living up there in the rocks, right beside the rattlers,” said the woman with a  real life Jurassic Park on her land. “Someone flew over the ranch in a hang glider years ago and discovered the site and they’ve been working on it on and off ever since.”

The Jeep bounced, rattled and shuddered its way over a track more suited to cowboys…

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Fathers and Sons

Marvin and Forrest Fenn

Lawrence and Dan Fogelberg

Yours and mine

    “The Leader of the Band”FogelbergBand

1942 DeKalb All Grade School Band Concert

Dan Fogelberg‘s father Lawrence

Dan certainly had a way with words-

                  “I’m Just a living Legacy to the leader of the band”

2nd verse:  “A quiet man of music
Denied a simpler fate
He tried to be a soldier once
But his music wouldn’t wait
He earned his love through discipline
A thundering, velvet hand
His gentle means of sculpting souls
Took me years to understand”

It puts me in mind of Marvin Fenn as school principal and Forrest’s tales of lessons learned.  (See the books.)

Full lyrics here: Dan Fogelberg – Leader Of The Band Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Pondering

Pondering

1972 Dinosaur National Monument

(Missing my Dad, too)

First fish?

 

“Afraid of Nothing”?

The “Afraid-of-Nothing” Dreadnoughtus schrani specimen recently uncovered in Patagonia is 7 times bigger than a Tyrannosaurus Rex, but I wonder how much brighter.

 

Skull of Tyrannosaurus rex, type specimen (CM ...Skull of Tyrannosaurus rex, type specimen (CM 9380) at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. This was heavily and inaccurately restored with plaster using Allosaurus as a model, and has since been disassembled. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If T Rex was just a big chicken, brain-wise, no wonder he’s no longer around.Photo: cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex braincase a...Photo: cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex braincase at the Australian Museum, Sydney. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)Tyrannosaurus rex "Sue" displayed at...Tyrannosaurus rex “Sue” displayed at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Moveable Feast---solar-powered, auto open and close chicken coop/tractor built by Mr. WMoveable Feast—solar-powered, auto open and close chicken coop/tractor built by Mr. W

I haven’t actually named the five hens, but one of the twin red ones is going to have to be called Ginger.  Not that there’s a Professor.  Possibly a Mrs. Howell…

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Fearless, fearsome, or chicken?

 

 

 

Cities of Gold

 

Cover of "Cities of Gold: A Journey Acros...

Cover via Amazo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I read another Douglas Preston book this spring.  (I bought this one, Mr. Preston.)   It was a departure from his horror/thrillers I’d read previously, but this non-fiction book was fascinating in another way.

He decided to retrace the steps of Coronado from the border of Mexico to the Pecos Pueblo in search of the Seven Cities of Gold.  It turns out that it was a bit of a wild goose chase for Coronado, but people will believe what they want to believe when it comes to treasures of gold.  Time hasn’t changed that.

Preston smoothly wove massive amounts of history into the story of his trek on horseback through some very harsh lands.  He’s also made use of the experience in some of his fiction, i.e. ThunderheadTyrannosaurus Canyon, and others.

Tyrannosaurus footprint from Philmont Scout Ra...

Tyrannosaurus footprint from Philmont Scout Ranch, New Mexico (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Let’s see.  Did Mapsmith call Dal foolhardy?  Well, let’s just say it takes a certain mix of courage, stamina, and not too much information to undertake some adventures.  Which is why the glory goes to the brave.  Kudos to all of you.  Lacking two of the above, I’m just happy to get the vicarious thrill when I read about your adventures.
Pecos Glazeware Bowl, labelled as serpent desi...

Pecos Glazeware Bowl, labelled as serpent design, Pecos National Historical Park From the ruins of the Pecos Pueblo in in San Miguel County, New Mexico.

 

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The Real Life Inspiration for Indiana Jones

Foster Raymond: Fossil Hunter

The Real Life Inspiration for Indiana Jones

Fossil Hunter Roy Chapman Andrews traveled Mongolia by camel and horse–fought packs of snakes–and discovered the terrifying Velociraptor!

Learn more here: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/amazing-life-roy-chapman-andrews/

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Dinosaur for Sale

Forrest Fenn's Treasure Chest

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

 

 

Wondering what to do if you find Fenn’s treasure chest? Just a thought, if you have room in your basement? barn? museum?
Myself? I’d keep the jewels. Just what is a coat bracelet, I wonder?

Trowels and Trenches

I need to borrow £600,000.

Or AU$1,006,629.

Don’t worry, I’m good for it.

Mark the 27th of November in your calendars everyone. That is the day that Misty, a Diplodocus longus dinosaur goes up for auction at the Summer Place auction house in Billingshurst, England. The 18m long and 6m high dinosaur is estimated to sell for somewhere between £400,000- 600,000 and is one of only a handful of Diplodocus’ in the world. In fact the bones of the Diplodocus are so rare that even London’s Natural History Museum displays a plaster cast that is based on two separate skeletons.

MistyIt took a team nine weeks to excavate Misty, after the fluke discovery of the female specimen outside of the Dana Quarry in Wyoming. Famed dinosaur hunter Raimund Albersdoerfer was undertaking an excavation in the quarry when he sent his sons to investigate the area, not expecting them to…

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Wandering in Wyoming (Part Two of Trip One)

como_bluff_4OCT_176

My sights were set on Montana, but I had time to check out (parts of) Wyoming.  The state is a collection of mountain ranges and basins.  I knew I couldn’t cover it all.  Had to scratch off Como Bluff and it’s dinosaur bone house—but it’s not open to the public anymore.

I planned to cover the Big Horn Canyon/Yellowtail Reservoir on my way home, but there was a huge change of plans along the way.  So, where did I leave off?  Worland. IMG_0149

In the morning I headed for Cody.  First up, the Buffalo Bill Dam in Shoshone Canyon where I met Buck, a volunteer at the Visitor Center.

Buck

Buck

Wonderful, interesting, happy guy who served his country well.

IMG_0190After that, back into Cody to visit an historic church which the gracious man of the collar opened to me.  It has an ancient Wurlitzer organ, of interest to few, but special to me.  I told myself I wouldn’t refer to the church by its nickname, but there it was, on a bronze plaque right outside the door….IMG_0188

Downtown for lunch at the Irma Hotel.  I gazed in the mirror and looked quickly down, to no avail. IMG_0195 I also picked up a neckerchief in case that would be of help in some deciphering I’ve been trying to do.

Pink

After lunch I hit 4 out of the 5 museums at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center where I saw a fetching Fechin, the pre-sale artworks of many talented people, Plains Indian artifacts, natural history exhibits, and so forth.  I skipped the Firearms Museum this time as Mr. W wasn’t along.  (Been there, done that.)

English: Main Entrance to the Cody Firearms Museum

Supper.  A double rainbow.  Discovered it was FF’s birthday, so I sent him best wishes and a note on my (lack of) progress.

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Next up?  I had reservations in West Yellowstone, the Gallatin Valley, and a certain hot springs over the next few days, but . . . .

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