Happy 85th Birthday, Forrest Fenn!

The Fisherman

The Fisherman

Another year has gone by with no one finding his hidden treasure, but there’s a great tribute to him over on Dal’s site.

morning in mountains

Wishing him many, many more years of “not missing his turn.”

From “Beowulf” (The Other Beowulf)

A Year In Verse

From “Beowulf and the Fire-Dragon”:

Hold thou now fast, O earth,now men no longer can,
The treasure of mighty earls.From thee brave men won it
In days that are long gone by,but slaughter seized on them,
Death fiercely vanquished them,each of my warriors,
Each one of my people,who closed their life-days here
After the joy of earth.None have I sword to wield
Or bring me the goblet,the richly wrought vessel.
All the true heroes haveelsewhere departed!
Now must the gilded helmlose its adornments,
For those who polished itsleep in the gloomy grave,
Those who made ready erstwar-gear of warriors.
Likewise the battle-sarkwhich in the fight endured
Bites of the keen-edged bladesmidst the loud crash of shields
Rusts, with its wearer dead.Nor may the woven mail
After the chieftain’s deathwide with a champion rove.
Gone is the joy of harp,gone is the music’s mirth.
Now the hawk goodly-wingedhovers not through the…

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The Sonnets

Forrest Fenn is writing poetry again.  I’d love to watch over his shoulder and see him at work. Is it a messy process with lots of words crossed out?  Or does he compose it in his head and only write what works? Does he adhere to form or formula?  Or is he a free spirit, free verse wordsmith?

English: Title page of Shakespeare's Sonnets (...

English: Title page of Shakespeare’s Sonnets (1609) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Photo credit Wikipedia

Apparently William Shakespeare  worried about leaving a legacy.  At least the young man narrating the Bard’s first  dozen or three sonnets did.  He stood gazing marvelously in the mirror, pondering, and concluded that he’d just have to get married and have a son. {Okay.  That’s more abbreviated than even a Cliff’s Notes version.} But, it made me think of the last chapter in Forrest Fenn’s Too Far To Walk where he gazes with marvel(?) in his mirror in a closing poem.

Legacy~~~

“Oh very young.  What will you leave us this time?” Cat Stevens

Riddle Me This

Screen shot 2014-10-06 at 8.20.42 PM Is the poem a riddle?  Not a classic Who am I or What am I, but Where am I?

 In which case, the first stanza would say something like I, the chest, went in there empty and then I went in there filled.  Forrest Fenn's Treasure Chest

Which raises the next question—the critical point of it all—in There, aka the Secret Where.

If Forrest wrote the poem as if it was a classic riddle, he might have imagined himself as the box personified and given clues accordingly.  Does this hold up? Screen shot 2014-10-06 at 8.19.41 PM

So, if the bronze chest is speaking to you, (no, I haven’t gone ‘um die ecke’, not yet anyway), and says “Take it in the canyon down”, “it” can’t be the chest, right? Or, then again, “take it”  might mean carry the chest .  Different train of thought….Screen shot 2014-10-06 at 8.20.28 PM

More wordplay?  Google –How to Write a Riddle Poem, etc.

Related articles

Where the Wild Thyme Blows

Thyme

Thyme

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows….

Wm. Shakespeare

No wild times in Santa Fe next month.  The Fenn gathering at the Loretto Inn and Spa has been canceled.

I’d like to have attended, and not just to meet the competition, though that in itself might prove fascinating.

And not that it would have been really wild, but you never know.

English: Wild thyme in the flower bed of a &qu...

English: Wild thyme in the flower bed of a “garden à la française” in the park of the castle of Champs-sur-Marne (Seine-et-Marne), France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Where Do I Begin…

Clues, bei Syke

Clues, bei Syke (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Where to begin?

Where did Forrest begin when he wrote the poem?  With the first clue, or the ninth?

“I knew all along where I wanted to hide the treasure so I didn’t need a map or any information to write the poem. Everything was in my head. It took me a while to get the wording exactly how I wanted it.  Counting the clues and hiding the chest came later. It is not likely that anyone will find it without following the clues, at least in their mind.”                                                                  Forrest Fenn 

 

{So, in my mind, it sounds like it’s possible to solve this treasure hunt from a distance, which is good news for people in the Midwest, or Europe, or any other of the xxx countries you visitors are from.)  

Also,  maybe the number of clues isn’t so important??  I don’t know.}IMG_0106

As the Munchkins always said, it’s best to start at the beginning—

Green Rainbow

—We know what lies at the end.

Forrest Fenn's Treasure ChestΩΩ

The Architect

English: A rough-sawn hemlock timber frame hor...

According to Forrest Fenn, the poem was written by an architect.

1900 barn

Barn built by Rich brothers in 1900 on the family farm

 

 

I saw this cool post on ‘poems that look like what they’re about’ and, of course, thought of the Thrill of the Chase treasure poem.

Is the poem a map?

 

Old barn in a valley

Synchronicity.

 

stone barn

Some things are built to last, like the poem—

—or the treasure’s resting spot, good for thousands of years.

 

Some things come crashing down—

—like your hopes if/when someone else finds the bronze chest.

 

IMG_0124

 

(Unless you’ve stored your treasures where they will not rust or be stolen.)