Update on Nov. 2nd Forrest Fenn Book Signing

Important read if you are planning a trip to Santa Fe for the Once Upon a While book release:

http://dalneitzel.com/2017/10/18/new-info-book-signing/#comments

Ticket from Collected Works Bookstore needed.

New Mexico Museum of Art

New Mexico Museum of Art

FROM DAL:  Anyone wanting a seat at the event must send a request for ticket/s either by:

  • Email to CWBookEvents@gmail.com with your name and phone number, requests will be processed in the order received and confirmed by return telephone call.
  • Or you may call the store at (505) 988-4226 and talk to Dorothy or Darrell between 9am-5pm daily. If not available, they will return your call promptly.

I can’t make it to this one, but plan to order a book once the dust has settled.

Enjoy all!

no fishing allowed

No Fishing Allowed

“Once Upon a While”

Save the Date! Forrest’s new book, Once Upon a While, launches November 2nd.

Book Signing at La Fonda

Of note: Forrest intended to leave his car in the parking lot of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.P1080035

 

Read the enlightening forward by Douglas Preston by clicking the link above.  He references Codex, the book he wrote based on his knowledge of Fenn and his plan for hiding the treasure chest.

chest

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

I read that book early in my search (along with several other of Preston’s suspense/horror novels, and then I read his tale of his retracing of Coronado’s journey north from the border of Mexico.IMG_0068

 

(Re-)Inspired?   Why not shoot for the moon?

Serendipity II close

Safety First… — Thrill Of The Chase

From the man himself (via Dal’s site):

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SUBMITTED JUNE, 2017 by Forrest When I said the treasure was not hidden in Utah or Idaho it has been my plan to not narrow the search area further. But in the light of a recent accident, and in the interest of safety, I feel it necessary to alter that plan. The treasure chest is…

via Safety First… — Thrill Of The Chase

Reblogged: Stop This Nonsense…… — Thrill Of The Chase

chest

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

A difference of opinions on the Chase. I’m with Forrest and Dal on this.

New Mexico State Patrol Chief, Pete Kassetas The New Mexico State Patrol Chief wants Forrest to stop the chase. He called it “nonsense” and suggested that Forrest should go get the chest “if it exists”. Pretty insulting, don’t you think? Pete Kassetas is the chief’s name and he seems to be pretty full of…

via Stop This Nonsense…… — Thrill Of The Chase

Why is Grandma Digging a Hole: 8 Reasons

chest

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

Just for Fun:

A Thomas Tale

My grandmother emailed me the other day that she was digging in her backyard and called the utility marking people beforehand. The man asked her a series of questions including “why are you digging?” She found this to be a personal matter and convinced the man that he didn’t need to know why she was digging. “But” she wrote, “you could practically hear the wheels turning.” We both got a kick out of that and decided it would be a good idea to come up with the eight most plausible reasons a grandmother might be digging a hole in her backyard. Without further ado, 8 Reasons Grandma is Digging a Hole (in no particular order):

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Just Sharing a Song

One tin soldier Listen people to a story That was written long ago, ’bout a kingdom on a mountain And the valley folks below. On the mountain was a treasure Hidden deep beneath a stone, And the valley people swore They’d have it for their very own. Go ahead and hate your neighbor, Go ahead […]

via One Tin Soldier — Life Through My Eyes

How do Gemstones get their Colors ? — Know-It-All

Reblogged this because it’s kinda cool:

The most common cause of color in gemstones is the presence of a small amount of a transition metal ion. Most gemstones are allochromatic, meaning that they are colored by impurities or trace elements in their crystal structure.

via How do Gemstones get their Colors ? — Know-It-All

100 Years Ago

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On Summer Seas (1916)

The National Park Service was created one hundred years ago.  Yellowstone preceded that, being designated in 1872.  And once upon a time, I dreamed of being a forest ranger.  My imagination had me up in a tower in a sea of green trees–a rather narrow view of the current job description.

morning in mountains

Glacier National Park

 

One of the more unique rangers we’ve met was dressed to the hilt as a French voyageur  and remained in character, impressing our youngest.  I think there was even bread baking involved.

 

voyageur_canoe

1868 Quetico Superior Route, Passing a Waterfall by Frances Anne Hopkins (Scene showing a large Hudson’s Bay Company freight canoe passing a waterfall, presumably on the French River. The passengers in the canoe may be the artist and her husband, Edward Hopkins, secretary to the Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.) (public domain)

That national park was the site of the Rainy Lake gold rush in the mid-1890’s.  Northern Minnesota is not the first place I’d think of when searching for gold.  Better odds, maybe, of finding Forrest Fenn’s treasure chest.

chest

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Chest

 

 

Portal

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I won’t be making it to this year’s Fennboree, but if I could, I would take a moment in Santa Fe to get a look at an ancient wrought iron gate on East Palace Avenue, the site where dozens if not hundreds of scientists, mathematicians, and physicists, after meeting with gatekeeper Dorothy McKibben, disappeared from sight beginning in April 1943.P1000401

(Well, first I might stop at that French pastry shop at La Fonda where Amy bought those gorgeous treats for Forrest’s book signing last September.)

Said portal transported those invited to the site of the Los Alamos Ranch School on a mesa in New Mexico.  You probably know (part of) the rest of the story, but for me, I learned a lot from a book called Bomb, by Steve Sheinkin, my newest favorite non-fiction author.  Wow.  He used to write textbooks for schools but kept notes on all the things they wouldn’t let him put in–fascinating stuff I should have learned.   Sheinkin puts it together in a compelling and quick read.  (Young Adult level but hey, who’s got time for an academic treatise these days?)

So back to the story:  the race between the Americans and the Germans to develop the bomb; some very, very brave Norwegians on a mission; the spies who wanted to steal the plans for Stalin;  the guys who just wanted to give it to the Russians so there wouldn’t be only one superpower in possession of the new and terrible weapon of mass destruction.

When I was young, my ideas of Russian spies were partly based on Boris and Natasha, and hearing intimations about the McCarthy era excesses.  Somehow my public school history classes never got much past the Civil War by the end of the school year, hence the black holes in my knowlege.  (No, that’s not a typo;  it’s spelled Fenn’s way.)

 

[Side note:  There was a Rocky and Bullwinkle episode titled Buried Treasure.  Hmm.  Frostbite Falls?]P1000443

 

I could also rave about Sheinkin’s newest book,  Most Dangerous:  Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret Viet Nam War.  I have no excuse for not knowing or remembering more about the topic, having been of school age when it was in the newspapers, except that the facts didn’t all make it into the media at the time.  I wish that weren’t still true. History gives us perspective if we’d only choose to look at the parallels in our own day.  Does your view of Ellsberg color your impression of Snowden?  What caused Benjamin Arnold to switch sides?  Had you even heard of the Port Chicago 50?

Do you agree with Abraham Lincoln?

“I am a firm believer in the people.  If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis.  The great point is to bring them the real facts.”

(Check out Steve Sheinkin’s  other books like King George:  What Was His Problem?  or The Port Chicago 50:  Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights or  Lincoln’s Grave Robbers, etc.)

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Catching Up is Hard to Do (hum to the tune by Neil Sedaka)

Kayak and lily pads Time on the water, priceless.  Home again?  Also priceless, but busy.  I was north.  I was east.  Was I west, “in the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe?”  No, darn it.  Not yet.  But this bronze reminded me of the drawing in the Thrill of the Chase book.kids sculpture columns Another great thing about the road trip?  Listening to the audio version of The Black Count, a true story about Alexandre Dumas’ pere by Tom Reiss.  Fascinating.  The Count of Monte Cristo was one of my first favorites.  I read an old copy found in the attic.  Next best was the 1998 French miniseries of it starring Gerard Depardieu.  I didn’t mind the subtitles, it was so engrossing.  And now to learn how so much of it was based on his own father’s experiences (including hidden treasure), enlightening.  Also, it explained a lot of the history of the French revolution/devolution/rise of Napoleon, areas my education was thin on.

Minnetrista

Minnetrista

So, my treasures when I arrived home?  A lawn turned to meadow, wild blackberries to forage, and a garden exploding with cukes, beans, and tomatos, etc.  Now that the pickles and jams are in the cupboard and the beans and tomatos in the freezer, except for the awesome salads Caprese and salsa verdes and, well, you get the idea.

Jungle garden

Jungle garden

Intrepid came to visit and fortunately she loves to pick berries, dig potatos, etc., just happy to be outdoors.  She’s begun her fourth (and purportedly toughest) year of residency.  Six twelve hours days on for a month, then six twelve hour nights for a month, then same at a different hospital, rinse, wash, repeat….  I’d help her if I could.  The least I can do is give her organic veggies. pickle pot

170-Year-Old Champagne Recovered (and Tasted) From a Baltic Shipwreck

Worth the cold — the bottles auctioned at up to 100,000 Euros.

Ancientfoods

The term “vintage” may now have a whole new meaning for wine lovers—a treasure trove of 170-year-old champagne has been unearthed from the bottom of the sea. In 2010, a group of divers in the Baltic Sea happened upon the remains of a sunken trade schooner just off the coast of Finland. Scattered amongst the wreckage 160 feet below the surface, they discovered a treasure sent from Dionysus himself—168 bottles of French bubbly that had aged in near perfect conditions for decades.

Although the local government ultimately claimed the bottles, a team of scientists led by Philippe Jeandet, a professor of food biochemistry at the University of Reims, was able to obtain a small sample of the preserved beverage for testing—and tasting. Their chemical and sensory analysis, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a unique lens into the past, offering information about conventional winemaking…

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